Lawrence A. Schiffman, D.O., FAOCD - Board Certified Dermatologist

Lawrence A. Schiffman, D.O., FAOCD - Board Certified Dermatologist


The Connection between Breast Cancer and Dermatology

Published October 31st, 2017 by Sahil

Throughout the years evidence has shown that there may be a correlation between breast cancer and melanoma in women. As early as 2004, an article published in the International Journal of Cancer states that women who have been diagnosed with (or successfully treated for) breast cancer were also 16 percent more likely to one day be diagnosed with melanoma. Conversely, women who were treated for melanoma at some point in their life, were 11 percent more likely to one day be diagnosed with breast cancer at some point. This correlation is what is known as a bi-directional link between the two diseases. Today, there have been a number of studies which lend validity to these earlier claims. According to a 2009 article published by the National Center for Biotechnological Information, not only does this bi-directional link exist between breast cancer and melanoma, but melanoma patients, who have a family history of breast cancer, should be referred to a breast clinic as soon as possible for an examination.

What Can You Do to Prevent Melanoma Cancer?


You may have heard you need to limit your sun exposure completely to avoid skin cancer. While that will help reduce the risk of skin cancer, yes, it is not entirely true. The sun gives us light, without it, life on this planet could not exist. Completely blocking it out of your everyday life is not only difficult, but often unnecessary for the average healthy person. Sunlight, in moderation, is actually beneficial for its ability to kick start your cells’ production of vitamin D, a vital nutrient your body needs to actually fight disease and keep your bones healthy. While it is true that recreational sun exposure and sunburn are causes of melanoma, the actual risk factor for melanoma is largely genetically related. Studies have shown that moderating your sunlight exposure is the leading preventative measure you can take to combat melanoma, but those who are genetically predisposed to it should be the most cautious of otherwise healthy people.

What Can You Do to Prevent Breast Cancer?


According to the Mayo Clinic, there are a number of different things you can do, and lifestyle changes you can integrate, that can help to prevent breast cancer. This list is not limited to (but does highlight) things like limiting your alcohol intake to less than one drink per day. Caution should be taken, however, as even a small amounts can still increase your risk. Another good idea for the prevention of breast cancer is to quit smoking, or to never start. While this is obvious for the overall health benefits to your body, studies show that smokers are also at higher risk for breast cancer, particularly with premenopausal women. Lastly, being physically will help you maintain a healthy weight and reduce your risk of breast cancer. The Department of Health and Human Services suggests adults should receive either 150 minutes of moderate anaerobic activity or 75 minutes of vigorous aerobic activity per week.

Dermatologist in Miami Florida

If you find anything that concerns you, contact Miami Skin Dr. Early detection of melanoma or skin cancer is key to being free of the tumor. Check out Miami Skin Dr to find out more.

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